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Depression With Birth Control Pills

Depression With Birth Control Pills

Depression With Birth Control Pills – Getting away from birth control, hormones and depression: Pictures – Health News Hormonal contraceptive use increases women’s risk of depression, study finds.

This study examined the relationship between women using hormonal birth control and antidepressants and a diagnosis of major depression. Hide caption Source AJPhoto/Science

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Depression With Birth Control Pills

This study examined the relationship between women using hormonal birth control and antidepressants and a diagnosis of major depression.

When the birth control pill became available 50 years ago, women wanted to know: Is it safe? There isn’t much evidence to answer this question, but women have taken the pill as a way to improve contraception.

Today, millions of women around the world use hormonal contraceptives, which have expanded beyond pills to include patches, implants, injections, and intrauterine devices. Decades of research support its safety, and serious but rare side effects such as blood clots are finally better understood. But other areas of research are lagging behind, and we still don’t know as much as we’d like about how these drugs affect women’s mental health.

So when research comes out linking hormonal birth control to depression, the headlines go crazy. Stories are made for good clicks but not good science reporting. Sufficient skepticism about a study can easily lead to the assumption that birth control causes depression when research shows no such thing.

, analyzed 14 years of health data on more than one million women from national health systems and databases unavailable in many other countries. It measures depression in two ways: a psychiatric diagnosis, which can be major depression, or filling a prescription for antidepressants. In the study, 2 percent of women ages 15 to 34 were diagnosed with depression in the hospital, and 13 percent started taking antidepressants.

Women Taking Oral Contraceptive Pills Less Likely To Report Depression

Many news reports report an 80 percent increase in the risk of depression among certain groups of women, but some claim that the risk is limited, a reflection of increasing equality. An 80 percent risk does not mean that 80 percent of women using hormonal birth control will develop depression. That means if 10 women not taking hormonal birth control develop stress, 18 women in their reproductive cycle will develop stress.

In this study, this 80 percent increase in relative risk was directly attributable to 15- to 19-year-olds taking combined oral contraceptives—the pill that contains both progestin and estrogen—starting to take antidepressants after switching to birth control.

However, looking at absolute risk provides little explanation. Among women not taking hormonal birth control, 1.7% were taking antidepressants and 0.28% were admitted to a psychiatric hospital for depression. In comparison, 2.2 percent of women who started birth control later started taking antidepressants, and 0.3 percent were diagnosed with depression in the hospital. In general, 0.5 percent of women who start hormonal contraception develop depression that they wouldn’t otherwise have.

“So for a woman, even if she’s using a contraceptive method, the odds of getting one of these outcomes in this study are very low, especially in a depression diagnosis,” explained Chelsea Polis, senior research scientist on the study. Guttmacher Institute.

Switching Birth Control Pills: Methods And Side Effects

The percentage of people filling prescriptions for antidepressants was higher than for other types of hormonal birth control: for example, 4.1 percent for the patch and 3.2 percent for the vaginal ring in the first year. Depression was diagnosed in 0.7% of patch users and 0.6% of vaginal ring users.

However, even in terms of risk, the increased risk was largely modest: for all women taking the combined pill, there was a 10 percent increased risk for a depression diagnosis and a 20 percent increased risk for antidepressant use after statistical adjustment for women’s age and education. Height, weight, and a history of endometriosis or polycystic ovary syndrome are all factors that contribute to the risk of depression.

Some increased risks range from 20 to 70 percent for all women, depending on the type of contraception. The biggest increase — more than three times the likelihood of starting antidepressants — was seen among young adults who used the ring or patch.

Another thing to consider is that these numbers represent correlation – two things happening at the same time may or may not be related.

Women Taking Pill More Likely To Be Treated For Depression, Study Finds

“Depression is common. Contraceptive use is common. So those two things often go together,” explains Jeffrey Jensen, professor of reproductive and developmental sciences and director of the Division of Women’s Health Research at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland. .

The study used several methods to rule out the possibility that other factors were contributing to depression. Jensen pointed out that women who took hormones to prevent pregnancy were more likely to take antidepressants for depression, but the authors did a separate analysis to compare women before and after they started contraception and still found an increased risk of depression.

This is not to say that birth control doesn’t cause depression, but it doesn’t mean that it does. Half a million women who take birth control pills, after starting hormonal contraception, it is important to know that such a large number of women are at risk of depression, which can be a serious illness.

For example, the study found that women who used hormonal contraceptives for four years had an increased risk of depression six months after they started using contraceptives, but the study found that women who used hormonal contraceptives actually had lower levels of depression than those who did not. These results are consistent with a previous large study that found a protective effect against depression with hormonal contraception, although this may lead many women with depression to discontinue their birth control. But the studies were done differently: Unlike the new study, the previous study included only women who had sex.

Birth Control Pills And Teen Depression Possibly Linked, Study Suggests

“Unfortunately, the analysis did not provide information on the frequency of depression diagnosis or antidepressant use among women using non-hormonal contraceptive methods such as copper IUDs,” Polis said. “Such comparisons may help clarify whether there are other factors common to women who choose to use contraception, not directly related to the hormonal content of specific contraceptive methods.”

For example, as previous research has shown, those who start having sex at a young age are at risk for depression and anxiety. Even among women in their 20s and 30s, the decision to start hormonal contraception is accompanied by a variety of other conditions in their lives that increase their risk of depression or anxiety—not long, but only about half a percent of women in the research. accident

But Lidegaard, co-author of the study, puzzles the possibility that sexual initiation may come with mental health. “Sex is a good thing for most women, so I don’t see why women should be discouraged from initiating sex,” Lidegaard said in an interview. She points out that single women can experience loneliness, which is a risk factor for depression, but when single women are asked about having sex, she says, “A lot of people feel very happy about how wonderful the experience of sex is. Why should women worry about it?”

“Physicians should probably be more cautious about giving young women contraception and finding a history of previous depression,” Lidegaard said.

Birth Control: Teenage Girls Who Take The Contraceptive Pill At Increased Risk Of Depression, Study Finds

There is no doubt that women respond differently to hormonal contraception. But this distinction is not well understood.

“We’re all very different, and we’re moving toward precision medicine,” says Catherine Monk, associate professor of psychiatry and director of research in the Women’s Program at Columbia University Medical Center. “There are some women who are more sensitive to these hormonal changes.”

The higher risk of depression in teenage girls, both Monk and Lidegaard said, may be natural because teens may be more sensitive to the hormonal changes that occur during puberty.

“You should know yourself and be truly appreciated,” said the monk. “If I’m an adult reading this article right now, I’m thinking, ‘Who am I? Do I get upset sometimes during my period?’ “He notes how important it is for every woman to consider these results and what she knows about her body and her circumstances.

Health Alert For Women: Early Use Of Birth Control Pills Linked To Higher Rates Of Depression, Study Finds

Philosophical differences about medicine may also affect how people interpret these results in the absence of causal studies. For example, Jensen showed that women in developed countries no longer see other women die in childbirth, illegal, unsafe abortions, or other harmful health consequences of unplanned pregnancy, and have reached areas where hormonal birth control is less effective.

“Women are more hesitant to use hormone therapy than ever before,” says Jensen. “Wealth is a disaster. If you really want to be depressed, you’re pregnant by accident.

On the other side of the spectrum, Monk believes we may have gone too far in using hormones to control contraception. “Escape from preventive measures

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  1. Depression With Birth Control PillsThis study examined the relationship between women using hormonal birth control and antidepressants and a diagnosis of major depression.Massive New Study Links Birth Control To Depression For The First TimeWhen the birth control pill became available 50 years ago, women wanted to know: Is it safe? There isn't much evidence to answer this question, but women have taken the pill as a way to improve contraception.Today, millions of women around the world use hormonal contraceptives, which have expanded beyond pills to include patches, implants, injections, and intrauterine devices. Decades of research support its safety, and serious but rare side effects such as blood clots are finally better understood. But other areas of research are lagging behind, and we still don't know as much as we'd like about how these drugs affect women's mental health.So when research comes out linking hormonal birth control to depression, the headlines go crazy. Stories are made for good clicks but not good science reporting. Sufficient skepticism about a study can easily lead to the assumption that birth control causes depression when research shows no such thing., analyzed 14 years of health data on more than one million women from national health systems and databases unavailable in many other countries. It measures depression in two ways: a psychiatric diagnosis, which can be major depression, or filling a prescription for antidepressants. In the study, 2 percent of women ages 15 to 34 were diagnosed with depression in the hospital, and 13 percent started taking antidepressants.Women Taking Oral Contraceptive Pills Less Likely To Report DepressionMany news reports report an 80 percent increase in the risk of depression among certain groups of women, but some claim that the risk is limited, a reflection of increasing equality. An 80 percent risk does not mean that 80 percent of women using hormonal birth control will develop depression. That means if 10 women not taking hormonal birth control develop stress, 18 women in their reproductive cycle will develop stress.In this study, this 80 percent increase in relative risk was directly attributable to 15- to 19-year-olds taking combined oral contraceptives—the pill that contains both progestin and estrogen—starting to take antidepressants after switching to birth control.However, looking at absolute risk provides little explanation. Among women not taking hormonal birth control, 1.7% were taking antidepressants and 0.28% were admitted to a psychiatric hospital for depression. In comparison, 2.2 percent of women who started birth control later started taking antidepressants, and 0.3 percent were diagnosed with depression in the hospital. In general, 0.5 percent of women who start hormonal contraception develop depression that they wouldn't otherwise have."So for a woman, even if she's using a contraceptive method, the odds of getting one of these outcomes in this study are very low, especially in a depression diagnosis," explained Chelsea Polis, senior research scientist on the study. Guttmacher Institute.Switching Birth Control Pills: Methods And Side EffectsThe percentage of people filling prescriptions for antidepressants was higher than for other types of hormonal birth control: for example, 4.1 percent for the patch and 3.2 percent for the vaginal ring in the first year. Depression was diagnosed in 0.7% of patch users and 0.6% of vaginal ring users.However, even in terms of risk, the increased risk was largely modest: for all women taking the combined pill, there was a 10 percent increased risk for a depression diagnosis and a 20 percent increased risk for antidepressant use after statistical adjustment for women's age and education. Height, weight, and a history of endometriosis or polycystic ovary syndrome are all factors that contribute to the risk of depression.Some increased risks range from 20 to 70 percent for all women, depending on the type of contraception. The biggest increase — more than three times the likelihood of starting antidepressants — was seen among young adults who used the ring or patch.Another thing to consider is that these numbers represent correlation - two things happening at the same time may or may not be related.Women Taking Pill More Likely To Be Treated For Depression, Study Finds"Depression is common. Contraceptive use is common. So those two things often go together," explains Jeffrey Jensen, professor of reproductive and developmental sciences and director of the Division of Women's Health Research at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland. .The study used several methods to rule out the possibility that other factors were contributing to depression. Jensen pointed out that women who took hormones to prevent pregnancy were more likely to take antidepressants for depression, but the authors did a separate analysis to compare women before and after they started contraception and still found an increased risk of depression.This is not to say that birth control doesn't cause depression, but it doesn't mean that it does. Half a million women who take birth control pills, after starting hormonal contraception, it is important to know that such a large number of women are at risk of depression, which can be a serious illness.For example, the study found that women who used hormonal contraceptives for four years had an increased risk of depression six months after they started using contraceptives, but the study found that women who used hormonal contraceptives actually had lower levels of depression than those who did not. These results are consistent with a previous large study that found a protective effect against depression with hormonal contraception, although this may lead many women with depression to discontinue their birth control. But the studies were done differently: Unlike the new study, the previous study included only women who had sex.Birth Control Pills And Teen Depression Possibly Linked, Study Suggests"Unfortunately, the analysis did not provide information on the frequency of depression diagnosis or antidepressant use among women using non-hormonal contraceptive methods such as copper IUDs," Polis said. "Such comparisons may help clarify whether there are other factors common to women who choose to use contraception, not directly related to the hormonal content of specific contraceptive methods."For example, as previous research has shown, those who start having sex at a young age are at risk for depression and anxiety. Even among women in their 20s and 30s, the decision to start hormonal contraception is accompanied by a variety of other conditions in their lives that increase their risk of depression or anxiety—not long, but only about half a percent of women in the research. accidentBut Lidegaard, co-author of the study, puzzles the possibility that sexual initiation may come with mental health. "Sex is a good thing for most women, so I don't see why women should be discouraged from initiating sex," Lidegaard said in an interview. She points out that single women can experience loneliness, which is a risk factor for depression, but when single women are asked about having sex, she says, "A lot of people feel very happy about how wonderful the experience of sex is. Why should women worry about it?""Physicians should probably be more cautious about giving young women contraception and finding a history of previous depression," Lidegaard said.Birth Control: Teenage Girls Who Take The Contraceptive Pill At Increased Risk Of Depression, Study FindsThere is no doubt that women respond differently to hormonal contraception. But this distinction is not well understood."We're all very different, and we're moving toward precision medicine," says Catherine Monk, associate professor of psychiatry and director of research in the Women's Program at Columbia University Medical Center. "There are some women who are more sensitive to these hormonal changes."The higher risk of depression in teenage girls, both Monk and Lidegaard said, may be natural because teens may be more sensitive to the hormonal changes that occur during puberty."You should know yourself and be truly appreciated," said the monk. "If I'm an adult reading this article right now, I'm thinking, 'Who am I? Do I get upset sometimes during my period?' "He notes how important it is for every woman to consider these results and what she knows about her body and her circumstances.Health Alert For Women: Early Use Of Birth Control Pills Linked To Higher Rates Of Depression, Study Finds