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Why Should Plastic Straws Be Banned

Why Should Plastic Straws Be Banned

Why Should Plastic Straws Be Banned – Banning plastic straws isn’t fair to people with disabilities, and here’s what we can do about it

We need to talk more about the negative impact these straw bans are having on people with disabilities – and what we can do to reverse this trend.

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Why Should Plastic Straws Be Banned

Unless you’re part of the small minority of the population that never uses a straw for drinking, you’ve probably noticed a growing trend toward banning or banning the use of plastic straws and other single-use plastic items. Will hear something about it. Some US cities, such as Oakland, California, have a partial ban that “prohibits the use of single-use plastic straws in city restaurants, bars and cafes unless customers request them.” Seattle, Washington, imposed an equally strict ban last year. Big companies are also starting to move away from plastic straws; Starbucks has announced that it will eliminate plastic straws by 2020, and many other cities and companies may join the movement. Some entire countries have announced bans on plastic straws: at the time of this article, Scotland is planning to be plastic straw-free by 2019 and Taiwan is banning single-use plastic items by 2030.

What Plastic Item Would You Love To Ban? 15 Ocean Experts (and Ted Speakers) Tell Us. |

Many have mixed feelings about these restrictions – some fully support the supposedly environmentally friendly policies. Others are reluctant to do so, perhaps because they don’t like the taste of paper straw alternatives.

But one voice that is not being taken into account when discussing the ban on plastic straws is that of people with disabilities. We need to talk more about the negative impact these straw bans are having on people with disabilities – and most importantly, what we can do to reverse this trend.

Fun fact: Did you know that bendable plastic straws were used by people with illnesses and disabilities before they became a mainstream container? As explained in this video, bendable straws were originally used in hospitals to make drinking easier for bedridden patients.

In fact, the flexible plastic straw is a visual aid that was used by disabled people before it was adopted and normalized by non-disabled people.

Canada’s Planned Single Use Plastics Ban: What We Know So Far And What You Can Do To Recycle Better

Before the straw was invented, people with disabilities “collected fluid in their lungs, got pneumonia and died,” said Sean Bickley, co-chair of the Seattle Commission for People with Disabilities, a volunteer organization that works with the City Council to advise. Organizations on disability issues, NPR said.

Why do we have to go back and implement policies that negatively affect people with disabilities and prevent them from using products specifically designed for them?

Many people with all types of disabilities and special needs rely on straws to hydrate and nourish themselves, consume food and drink, and participate in social and recreational activities. Without plastic straws, they will be unable to accept food and drinks served in stores or may be placed under an unrealistic obligation to carry and maintain their own reusable straws. (More on this below.)

Imposing a requirement on disabled customers or their caregivers to request a straw creates an opt-in system that places a burden on people with disabilities who rely on straws. For some people, these utensils are necessary for accommodation: without them, people with disabilities would not be able to take food and drink provided by an establishment.

Why Disabled People Need Plastic Straws

In addition, many disabilities that require the use of a straw are invisible. Consumers’ explicit requests for plastic straws may force people with disabilities to interpret their disabilities or needs in a way that creates unnecessary barriers to daily activities. Imagine if every time you went to the movies, ordered a soda at a sporting event, or had a drink at your local coffee shop or supermarket, the food service staff had to explain to you that you have a rare form of arthritis. What is it?

Not only is this discriminatory and violates the spirit of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), company employees may not know how to respond to requests or, worse, may be perceived as gatekeepers to others’ quality of life. They may be coercing people – which means they can decide who has a disability and who doesn’t, which is a very dangerous assumption.

First, people with disabilities who rely on plastic straws know that there are alternatives. Someone has to remind us. The problem is that not every alternative has the same useful properties as plastic straws. For example:

These elements can also have unintended consequences. Alternatives to plastic straws can be made from ingredients that contain corn, gluten and other major allergens. This includes the glue used for paper straw. Despite safety assurances from companies like Starbucks that have switched to compostable alternatives, these allergies still lead to emergency room visits in anaphylaxis. There are currently no rules that say these straw allergens must be shared, and there is little research on how many allergic people react to these straws.

South Korea Suspends Plastic Straw Ban To Ease Small Business’ Economic Burden

Sometimes these consequences can be fatal. The New York Times reported earlier this year that a disabled British woman died after falling onto a metal straw that was holding her.

People with arthritis and autoimmune diseases also face some unique obstacles that many people are unaware of. Cleaning reusable straws is incredibly difficult when our ailments affect the physical function of our hands. There is no practical way to clean silicone straws after use to reduce the risk of infection or mold growth. And people with autoimmune diseases have weak immune systems from childhood.

Bans on plastic straws often put disabled people on the wrong side of the fight to protect the environment – as if we don’t care about our world. As someone who has to use plastic straws and disposable wipes, I can’t help but feel that my needs aren’t 100 percent eco-friendly.

“Over the years, I’ve learned that an eco-friendly lifestyle doesn’t always meet my accessibility needs,” wrote author Penny Pepper in this recent Guardian article. About plastic straws and baby wipes, she says, “Like many other disabled people, I need both. Not as a lifestyle choice. Not as a luxury. I want drinking straws that bend, drinking straws that can withstand all drinks and all temperatures, including medicine. I want straws that aren’t too thick so I don’t choke or have a hard time keeping them in my mouth.”

Plastic Straw Ban: Beverage Companies Fear Losing ₹10 Packs To Plastic Straw Ban

But just because we people with disabilities can’t check every box on the “green” checklist doesn’t mean we aren’t fighting for the environment. There are many ways people can offset their carbon footprint. For example, I take reusable bags with me to the local co-op where I shop, where I make sure to buy as much local produce as possible. I know I can take more steps to reduce my carbon footprint. This also applies to every single person on this planet.

Why are disabled people highlighted in this debate? Especially when capable people develop new habits and can offset much larger carbon footprints than we do.

These restrictions do not seem to help solve real environmental problems. Alternative straws are still in landfills. In the larger picture of how our individual and collective habits affect pollution, plastic straws are only a small part of a much larger and complex conversation. This debate must address how entire companies and industries affect the environment, particularly in relation to the actions and needs of individuals.

According to a 2018 report on how different companies contribute to plastic pollution, Coca-Cola, Pepsi-Co, Nestle, Mars and Unilever are the biggest polluters. American industry has always had a greater impact on pollution than individual citizens, but our perception of this may be distorted by manufacturers’ direct efforts to focus pollution more on people than on products and production processes. According to this Mother Jones article, in the early 1950s, several companies banded together to coin the term “litterbugs” and began a “Keep America Beautiful” public relations campaign that blamed people and personalized pollution levels. problems and not social problems.

There Must Be A Better Option For Thick Shakes Because Paper Straws Suck!

We must ensure that single-use plastic straws remain available without stigma to those in our society who depend on them for the reasons mentioned above. We can put pressure on corporate polluters and push for laws that hold them accountable. This would be much better than putting the responsibility on individuals especially the disabled.

We can try to put ourselves in the shoes (and hearts and minds) of people with disabilities before going down an arbitrary path. We need to think about how such policies affect all members of our community.

And if plastic straws are not needed? Avoid using them. We help advocate for those who do.

If you want to be part of the movement to support disabled people who want plastic

Plastic Straws Are Banned From Many Beaches; Now Ban Plastic From Your Home

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  1. Why Should Plastic Straws Be BannedUnless you're part of the small minority of the population that never uses a straw for drinking, you've probably noticed a growing trend toward banning or banning the use of plastic straws and other single-use plastic items. Will hear something about it. Some US cities, such as Oakland, California, have a partial ban that "prohibits the use of single-use plastic straws in city restaurants, bars and cafes unless customers request them." Seattle, Washington, imposed an equally strict ban last year. Big companies are also starting to move away from plastic straws; Starbucks has announced that it will eliminate plastic straws by 2020, and many other cities and companies may join the movement. Some entire countries have announced bans on plastic straws: at the time of this article, Scotland is planning to be plastic straw-free by 2019 and Taiwan is banning single-use plastic items by 2030.What Plastic Item Would You Love To Ban? 15 Ocean Experts (and Ted Speakers) Tell Us. |Many have mixed feelings about these restrictions - some fully support the supposedly environmentally friendly policies. Others are reluctant to do so, perhaps because they don't like the taste of paper straw alternatives.But one voice that is not being taken into account when discussing the ban on plastic straws is that of people with disabilities. We need to talk more about the negative impact these straw bans are having on people with disabilities – and most importantly, what we can do to reverse this trend.Fun fact: Did you know that bendable plastic straws were used by people with illnesses and disabilities before they became a mainstream container? As explained in this video, bendable straws were originally used in hospitals to make drinking easier for bedridden patients.In fact, the flexible plastic straw is a visual aid that was used by disabled people before it was adopted and normalized by non-disabled people.Canada's Planned Single Use Plastics Ban: What We Know So Far And What You Can Do To Recycle BetterBefore the straw was invented, people with disabilities "collected fluid in their lungs, got pneumonia and died," said Sean Bickley, co-chair of the Seattle Commission for People with Disabilities, a volunteer organization that works with the City Council to advise. Organizations on disability issues, NPR said.Why do we have to go back and implement policies that negatively affect people with disabilities and prevent them from using products specifically designed for them?Many people with all types of disabilities and special needs rely on straws to hydrate and nourish themselves, consume food and drink, and participate in social and recreational activities. Without plastic straws, they will be unable to accept food and drinks served in stores or may be placed under an unrealistic obligation to carry and maintain their own reusable straws. (More on this below.)Imposing a requirement on disabled customers or their caregivers to request a straw creates an opt-in system that places a burden on people with disabilities who rely on straws. For some people, these utensils are necessary for accommodation: without them, people with disabilities would not be able to take food and drink provided by an establishment.Why Disabled People Need Plastic StrawsIn addition, many disabilities that require the use of a straw are invisible. Consumers' explicit requests for plastic straws may force people with disabilities to interpret their disabilities or needs in a way that creates unnecessary barriers to daily activities. Imagine if every time you went to the movies, ordered a soda at a sporting event, or had a drink at your local coffee shop or supermarket, the food service staff had to explain to you that you have a rare form of arthritis. What is it?Not only is this discriminatory and violates the spirit of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), company employees may not know how to respond to requests or, worse, may be perceived as gatekeepers to others' quality of life. They may be coercing people - which means they can decide who has a disability and who doesn't, which is a very dangerous assumption.First, people with disabilities who rely on plastic straws know that there are alternatives. Someone has to remind us. The problem is that not every alternative has the same useful properties as plastic straws. For example:These elements can also have unintended consequences. Alternatives to plastic straws can be made from ingredients that contain corn, gluten and other major allergens. This includes the glue used for paper straw. Despite safety assurances from companies like Starbucks that have switched to compostable alternatives, these allergies still lead to emergency room visits in anaphylaxis. There are currently no rules that say these straw allergens must be shared, and there is little research on how many allergic people react to these straws.South Korea Suspends Plastic Straw Ban To Ease Small Business' Economic BurdenSometimes these consequences can be fatal. The New York Times reported earlier this year that a disabled British woman died after falling onto a metal straw that was holding her.People with arthritis and autoimmune diseases also face some unique obstacles that many people are unaware of. Cleaning reusable straws is incredibly difficult when our ailments affect the physical function of our hands. There is no practical way to clean silicone straws after use to reduce the risk of infection or mold growth. And people with autoimmune diseases have weak immune systems from childhood.Bans on plastic straws often put disabled people on the wrong side of the fight to protect the environment - as if we don't care about our world. As someone who has to use plastic straws and disposable wipes, I can't help but feel that my needs aren't 100 percent eco-friendly."Over the years, I've learned that an eco-friendly lifestyle doesn't always meet my accessibility needs," wrote author Penny Pepper in this recent Guardian article. About plastic straws and baby wipes, she says, “Like many other disabled people, I need both. Not as a lifestyle choice. Not as a luxury. I want drinking straws that bend, drinking straws that can withstand all drinks and all temperatures, including medicine. I want straws that aren't too thick so I don't choke or have a hard time keeping them in my mouth."Plastic Straw Ban: Beverage Companies Fear Losing ₹10 Packs To Plastic Straw BanBut just because we people with disabilities can't check every box on the "green" checklist doesn't mean we aren't fighting for the environment. There are many ways people can offset their carbon footprint. For example, I take reusable bags with me to the local co-op where I shop, where I make sure to buy as much local produce as possible. I know I can take more steps to reduce my carbon footprint. This also applies to every single person on this planet.Why are disabled people highlighted in this debate? Especially when capable people develop new habits and can offset much larger carbon footprints than we do.These restrictions do not seem to help solve real environmental problems. Alternative straws are still in landfills. In the larger picture of how our individual and collective habits affect pollution, plastic straws are only a small part of a much larger and complex conversation. This debate must address how entire companies and industries affect the environment, particularly in relation to the actions and needs of individuals.According to a 2018 report on how different companies contribute to plastic pollution, Coca-Cola, Pepsi-Co, Nestle, Mars and Unilever are the biggest polluters. American industry has always had a greater impact on pollution than individual citizens, but our perception of this may be distorted by manufacturers' direct efforts to focus pollution more on people than on products and production processes. According to this Mother Jones article, in the early 1950s, several companies banded together to coin the term "litterbugs" and began a "Keep America Beautiful" public relations campaign that blamed people and personalized pollution levels. problems and not social problems.There Must Be A Better Option For Thick Shakes Because Paper Straws Suck!We must ensure that single-use plastic straws remain available without stigma to those in our society who depend on them for the reasons mentioned above. We can put pressure on corporate polluters and push for laws that hold them accountable. This would be much better than putting the responsibility on individuals especially the disabled.We can try to put ourselves in the shoes (and hearts and minds) of people with disabilities before going down an arbitrary path. We need to think about how such policies affect all members of our community.And if plastic straws are not needed? Avoid using them. We help advocate for those who do.If you want to be part of the movement to support disabled people who want plasticPlastic Straws Are Banned From Many Beaches; Now Ban Plastic From Your Home