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How To Control Your Emotions

How To Control Your Emotions

How To Control Your Emotions – This article was co-authored by Trudy Griffin, LPC, MS. Trudy Griffin is a licensed professional counselor in Wisconsin specializing in substance abuse and mental health. She treats people struggling with addiction, mental health and trauma in public health and private practice. She received her Masters in Clinical Mental Health Counseling from Marquette University in 2011.

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How To Control Your Emotions

An article is marked as reader approved when it receives enough positive feedback. This article received 21 comments and 88% of readers who voted found it helpful, earning it “Reader Approved” status.

How To Manage And Control Your Emotions In Any Situation

While there is nothing wrong with all emotions, some emotions can cause major problems if left untreated. Fortunately, there are a number of mental health techniques and lifestyle changes you can use to manage and overcome these negative emotions.

This article was co-authored by Trudy Griffin, LPC, MS. Trudy Griffin is a licensed professional counselor in Wisconsin specializing in substance abuse and mental health. She treats people struggling with addiction, mental health and trauma in public health and private practice. She received her Masters in Clinical Mental Health Counseling from Marquette University in 2011. The article has been read 2,897,656 times.

The content of this article is not a substitute for professional medical advice, examination, diagnosis or treatment. You should always consult your doctor or other qualified healthcare professional before starting, changing or stopping any treatment.

To control your emotions, take a deep breath for one minute, hold it for two seconds, and then exhale. Continue breathing in the same way until you begin to relax. You can try focusing on something around you, such as seeing or smelling something, to bring you back to the present moment so you don’t get caught up in your emotions. If you feel overwhelmed, try doing the opposite of what you normally do, such as walking away or saying nothing. Read on for tips from our reviewer on how to identify and eliminate sources of stress! By clicking Continue to become a member or register, you agree to the User Agreement, Privacy Policy and Cookie Policy.

Emotions Vs Actions. Control Your Actions, Not Your…

When you’re in the middle of a conflict, it’s normal to automatically fall into a fight-or-flight mentality. But it is possible to stop this reaction and open the way to a more productive discussion. Start by breathing deeply and focusing on your body. Repeat to yourself a mantra such as “It’s not about me,” “This will pass,” or “It’s about the business.” And try to distance yourself from your negative feelings: “He’s so wrong about this and it’s driving me crazy. I think my coworker is wrong and I’m angry. which one.” And don’t forget the importance of taking breaks. The more time you spend processing your feelings, the weaker they become.

It’s hard not to get emotional during a difficult conversation. However, disagreement can feel like a threat. You fear that you will have to give up something – your way of thinking, your habit of doing something, your sense of self-righteousness or even power – and your body will resist you. Fight by developing the sympathetic nervous system. It’s a natural reaction, but the problem is that our body and mind are not very good at distinguishing between the threats that arise when we don’t get your way on a project plan and when, for example, we are chased by a bear , that will get into your pores and you will feel uncomfortable.

None of this will put you in the right frame of mind to resolve a conflict. When your body goes into “fight or flight” mode, or what Dan Goleman calls “amygdala hijacking,” you can lose access to the part of your brain responsible for logical thinking. And making logical decisions is exactly what you need to do in difficult negotiations. Not only will you lose the ability to think clearly, but your colleague will likely notice signs of stress – your face turns red, your speech speed increases – and thanks to mirror neurons we “catch” emotions. “. The other person, your colleague, will start to feel the same way. Before you know it, the conversation will come to a standstill and the conflict will escalate.

Fortunately, it is possible to stop this physical reaction, control your emotions, and pave the way for a productive discussion. There are many things you can do to keep your cool during the job interview or to relax when you are tired.

Manage My Emotions: The Ultimate Guide On How To Control Your Emotions, Learn Effective Methods On How To Command And Master Your Emotions To Live A Better Life

Breathing Simple mindfulness techniques can be your best friend in stressful situations, and none are more direct and useful than using your breathing. So if you start to feel tired, try focusing on breathing. Notice the feeling of air flowing in and out of your lungs. Feel it go through your nose or throat. It takes your attention away from the physical signs of anxiety and keeps you focused. Some mindfulness experts recommend counting your breaths, such as inhaling and exhaling for a count of six, or counting each breath until you reach a count of ten and then starting again.

Pay attention to your body. If you’re having a difficult conversation, sitting down can exacerbate emotions rather than diffuse them. Experts say walking and hiking can help activate the thinking part of your brain. If you and your colleague are sitting at the table, you can suddenly stop. truthful. Instead, say, “I feel like I need to stretch a bit. Can I walk a little?’ If it still doesn’t feel comfortable, you can do small physical things like crossing your two toes or planting your feet firmly on the ground and seeing how the ground feels under your shoes. Mental health professionals call this “anchoring.” It can work in any stressful situation. For example, I was afraid of flying for a long time, but I found that counting on my fingers while touching each finger helped me get out of my state of fear.

Try chanting the mantra. These are some tips I got from Amy Jane Sue, Managing Partner at Paravis Partners and author of Room Owner. It suggests a phrase you can repeat to yourself to help you stay calm. Some of his clients found “going neutral” to be helpful advice. You can also try options like “It’s not about me,” “It’s about,” or “It’s about business.”

Accept your feelings and label them. Another useful tactic comes from Susan David, author of Emotional Intelligence. When you’re emotional, “focusing on your thoughts and feelings will crowd your mind; there’s no room to explore them,” she says. Highlight it to distract yourself from the emotions. “Call a thought a thought and a feeling a feeling,” says David. He is very wrong about this and I think my colleague is wrong and I am angry. By marking it this way, you can see your thoughts and feelings: “temporary sources of information that may or may not be useful.” If you leave some space between these feelings and you, it will be easier to let them go – not to bury them or explode them.

Control Your Emotions!!!

Take a break. In my experience, this is a rarely used approach. The more time you spend processing your feelings, the stronger they will become. So when things get heated, you might need to excuse yourself for a moment: get a cup of coffee or a glass of water, go to the bathroom, or take a quick walk around the office. Make sure you give a neutral reason why you want to end the conversation. The last thing your colleague thinks is that the situation is so bad that you want to run away. ‘Sorry to interrupt, but I’d like a quick cup of coffee before I go on. Can I get you something while I’m sleeping? say that

Remember that you are not the only one in pain. Your colleague may also express anger or frustration. While you can give them the above advice, no one wants to tell them to take a deep breath or take a break. So you may be in a situation where you have to give permission

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  1. How To Control Your EmotionsAn article is marked as reader approved when it receives enough positive feedback. This article received 21 comments and 88% of readers who voted found it helpful, earning it "Reader Approved" status.How To Manage And Control Your Emotions In Any SituationWhile there is nothing wrong with all emotions, some emotions can cause major problems if left untreated. Fortunately, there are a number of mental health techniques and lifestyle changes you can use to manage and overcome these negative emotions.This article was co-authored by Trudy Griffin, LPC, MS. Trudy Griffin is a licensed professional counselor in Wisconsin specializing in substance abuse and mental health. She treats people struggling with addiction, mental health and trauma in public health and private practice. She received her Masters in Clinical Mental Health Counseling from Marquette University in 2011. The article has been read 2,897,656 times.The content of this article is not a substitute for professional medical advice, examination, diagnosis or treatment. You should always consult your doctor or other qualified healthcare professional before starting, changing or stopping any treatment.To control your emotions, take a deep breath for one minute, hold it for two seconds, and then exhale. Continue breathing in the same way until you begin to relax. You can try focusing on something around you, such as seeing or smelling something, to bring you back to the present moment so you don't get caught up in your emotions. If you feel overwhelmed, try doing the opposite of what you normally do, such as walking away or saying nothing. Read on for tips from our reviewer on how to identify and eliminate sources of stress! By clicking Continue to become a member or register, you agree to the User Agreement, Privacy Policy and Cookie Policy.Emotions Vs Actions. Control Your Actions, Not Your…When you're in the middle of a conflict, it's normal to automatically fall into a fight-or-flight mentality. But it is possible to stop this reaction and open the way to a more productive discussion. Start by breathing deeply and focusing on your body. Repeat to yourself a mantra such as “It's not about me,” “This will pass,” or “It's about the business.” And try to distance yourself from your negative feelings: "He's so wrong about this and it's driving me crazy. I think my coworker is wrong and I'm angry. which one." And don't forget the importance of taking breaks. The more time you spend processing your feelings, the weaker they become.It's hard not to get emotional during a difficult conversation. However, disagreement can feel like a threat. You fear that you will have to give up something – your way of thinking, your habit of doing something, your sense of self-righteousness or even power – and your body will resist you. Fight by developing the sympathetic nervous system. It's a natural reaction, but the problem is that our body and mind are not very good at distinguishing between the threats that arise when we don't get your way on a project plan and when, for example, we are chased by a bear , that will get into your pores and you will feel uncomfortable.None of this will put you in the right frame of mind to resolve a conflict. When your body goes into “fight or flight” mode, or what Dan Goleman calls “amygdala hijacking,” you can lose access to the part of your brain responsible for logical thinking. And making logical decisions is exactly what you need to do in difficult negotiations. Not only will you lose the ability to think clearly, but your colleague will likely notice signs of stress - your face turns red, your speech speed increases - and thanks to mirror neurons we "catch" emotions. ". The other person, your colleague, will start to feel the same way. Before you know it, the conversation will come to a standstill and the conflict will escalate.Fortunately, it is possible to stop this physical reaction, control your emotions, and pave the way for a productive discussion. There are many things you can do to keep your cool during the job interview or to relax when you are tired.Manage My Emotions: The Ultimate Guide On How To Control Your Emotions, Learn Effective Methods On How To Command And Master Your Emotions To Live A Better LifeBreathing Simple mindfulness techniques can be your best friend in stressful situations, and none are more direct and useful than using your breathing. So if you start to feel tired, try focusing on breathing. Notice the feeling of air flowing in and out of your lungs. Feel it go through your nose or throat. It takes your attention away from the physical signs of anxiety and keeps you focused. Some mindfulness experts recommend counting your breaths, such as inhaling and exhaling for a count of six, or counting each breath until you reach a count of ten and then starting again.Pay attention to your body. If you're having a difficult conversation, sitting down can exacerbate emotions rather than diffuse them. Experts say walking and hiking can help activate the thinking part of your brain. If you and your colleague are sitting at the table, you can suddenly stop. truthful. Instead, say, “I feel like I need to stretch a bit. Can I walk a little?' If it still doesn't feel comfortable, you can do small physical things like crossing your two toes or planting your feet firmly on the ground and seeing how the ground feels under your shoes. Mental health professionals call this “anchoring.” It can work in any stressful situation. For example, I was afraid of flying for a long time, but I found that counting on my fingers while touching each finger helped me get out of my state of fear.Try chanting the mantra. These are some tips I got from Amy Jane Sue, Managing Partner at Paravis Partners and author of Room Owner. It suggests a phrase you can repeat to yourself to help you stay calm. Some of his clients found “going neutral” to be helpful advice. You can also try options like "It's not about me," "It's about," or "It's about business."Accept your feelings and label them. Another useful tactic comes from Susan David, author of Emotional Intelligence. When you're emotional, "focusing on your thoughts and feelings will crowd your mind; there's no room to explore them," she says. Highlight it to distract yourself from the emotions. “Call a thought a thought and a feeling a feeling,” says David. He is very wrong about this and I think my colleague is wrong and I am angry. By marking it this way, you can see your thoughts and feelings: "temporary sources of information that may or may not be useful." If you leave some space between these feelings and you, it will be easier to let them go – not to bury them or explode them.Control Your Emotions!!!